Research References

for Emergent Literacy / Beginning Reading

Adams, M.J. (1990). Beginning to read: Thinking and learning about print. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Barnhart, J.E. (1986). Written language concepts and cognitive development in kindergarten children. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

Barr, R. (1984). Beginning reading instruction: From debate to reformation. In P.D. Pearson (Ed.), Handbook of Reading Research. New York: Longman.

Bridge, C.A., Winograd, P.N., & Haley, D. (1983). Using predictable materials vs. preprimers to teach beginning sight words. The Reading Teacher, 36(9), 884-891.

Brown, M.H. (1991). Coming to literacy through shared book experiences. In B. Persky and L.H. Golubchick (Eds.), Early childhood education (2nd ed.) (337-344). Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

Cassidy, J.K. (1988). Beginning reading with big books. Childhood Education, 65, 18-23.

Choate, S., & Castle, M. (1989). Integrating LEA and invented spelling in kindergarten. The Reading Teacher, 42, 516-519.

Chomsky, C. (1979). Approaching reading through invented spelling. In L.B. Resnick and P.A. Weaver (Eds.), Theory and practice in early reading (Vol. 2, 43-65). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Clarke, L.K. (1988). Invented versus traditional spelling in first graders' writings: Effects on learning to spell and read. Research on the Teaching of English, 22 (3), 218-308.

Combs, M. (1987). Modeling the reading process with enlarged texts. The Reading Teacher, 40(4), 422-426.

Cullinan, B.E. (1989). Literature for young children. In D.S. Strickland and L.M. Morrow (Eds.), Emerging literacy: Young children learn to read and write (96-159). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Cunningham, P.M., & Cunningham, J.W. (1992). Making words: Enhancing the invented spelling-decoding connection. The Reading Teacher, 46, 106-115.

Downing, J. (1989). Cognitive clarity: A unifying and cross-cultural theory for language awareness phenomena in reading. In D.B. Yaden and S. Templeton (Eds.), Metalinguistic awareness and beginning literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Dyson, A.H. (1985). Children's early interpretations of writing: Expanding research perspectives. In D.B. Yaden and S. Templeton (Eds.), Metalinguistic awareness and beginning literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Ehri, L.C. (1988). Movement in word reading and spelling. In J. Mason (Ed.), Reading and writing connections. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Eller, R.G., Pappas, C.C., & Brown, E. (1988). The lexical development of kindergartners: Learning from written context. Journal of Reading Behavior, 20, 5-24.

Elley, W.B. (1989). Vocabulary acquisition from listening to stories. Reading Research Quarterly, 24, 174-187.

Ferreiro, E., & Teberosky, A. (1982). Literacy before schooling. Exeter, NH: Heinemann.

Galda, L., & Cullinan, B.E. (1991). Literature for literacy: What research says about the benefits of using trade books in the classroom. In J. Flood, J.M. Jensen, D. Lapp, and J.R. Squire (Eds.), Handbook of research on teaching the English language arts (529-535). New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Glaer, S.M. (1989). Oral language and literacy development. In D.S. Strickland and L.M. Morrow (Eds.), Emerging literacy: Young children learn to read and write (96-159). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Griffith, P.L., & Olson, M.W. (1992). Phonemic awareness helps beginning readers break the code. The Reading Teacher, 45, 516-523.

Heath, S.B. (1983). Ways with words: Language, life, and work in communities and classrooms. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Heath, S.B. (1982). What no bedtime story means: Narrative skills at home and school. Language and Society, 11, 49-76.

Holdaway, D. (1980). Independence in reading. Gasbord, NSW: Ashton Scholastic.

Holdaway, D. (1979). The foundations of literacy. Sydney, Australia: Ashton Scholastic, distributed by Heinemann, Portsmouth, NH.

Lamme, L. (1985). Growing up reading. Washington, DC: Acropolis.

Leung, C., & Pikulski, J.J. (1990). Incidental word learning of kindergarten and first grade children through repeated read aloud events. In J. Zutell & S. McCormick (Eds.), Literacy, theory and research: Analyses from multiple paradigms. Chicago: National Reading Conference.

Lundberg, I., Frost, J., & Peterson, O. (1988). Effects of an extensive program for stimulating phonological awareness in preschool children. Reading Research Quarterly, 23, 263-284.

Martine, M., & Roser, N. (1985). Read it again: The value of repeated readings during storytime. The Reading Teacher, 38, 782-786.

Morrow, L.M. (1989). Designing the classroom to promote literacy development. In D.S. Strickland and L.M. Morrow (Eds.), Emerging literacy: Young children learn to read and write (96-159). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Pikulski, J.J. & Kellner, M. (1992). The repeated, shared reading of big books: More than the memoriation of text. Trade Secrets, 11(2), 3-5.

Richgels, D.J. (1987). Experimental reading with invented spelling (ERIS): A preschool and kindergarten method. The Reading Teacher, 40, 522-531.

Schickendan, J.A. (1989). The place of specific skills in preschool and kindergarten. In D. S. Strickland and L. M. Morrow (Eds.), Emerging literacy: Young children learn to read and write (96-159). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Schickendan, J.A. (1978). Please read that story again. Young Children, 33(5), 48-54.

Snow, C.R. (1983). Language and literacy: Relationships during the preschool years. Harvard Educational Review, 53, 165-189.

Strickland, D.S. (1991). Emerging literacy: How young children learn to read. In B. Persky and L.H. Golubchick (Eds.), Early childhood education (2nd ed.) (337-344). Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

Strickland, D.S., & Feeley, J.T. (1991). Development in the early school years. In J. Flood, J.M. Jensen, D. Lapp, and J.R. Squire (Eds.), Handbook of research on teaching the English language arts (529-535). New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

Strickland, D.S., & Taylor, D. (1989). Family storybook reading: Implications for children, families, and curriculum. In D.S. Strickland and L.M. Morrow (Eds.), Emerging literacy: Young children learn to read and write (27-34). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Sulby, E. (1985). Children's emergent reading of favorite storybooks: A developmental study. Reading Research Quarterly, 20 (4), 458-481.

Taylor, D. (1983). Family literacy: Young children learn to read and write. Exeter, NH: Heinemann.

Teale, W.H. (1987). Emergent literacy: Reading and writing development in early childhood. In E. Readance and R. S. Baldwin (Eds.), Research in literacy: Merging perspectives (45-74). Thirty-sixth yearbook of the National Reading Conference. Rochester, NY: National Reading Council.

Teale, W.H., & Sulby, E. (1989). Emergent literacy: New perspectives. In D.S. Strickland and L. M. Morrow (Eds.), Emerging literacy: Young children learn to read and write. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Teale, W.H., & Sulby, E. (1986). Emergent literacy as a perspective for examining how young children become writers and readers. In W.H. Teale and E. Sulby (Eds.), Emergent literacy: Writing and reading (vii-xxv). Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corporation.

Tunmer, W.E., & Nesdale, A.R. (1985). Phonemic segmentation skill and beginning reading. Journal of Educational Psychology, 77, 417-427.

Wells, G. (1986). The meaning makers: Children learning and using language to learn. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Yaden, D. (1989). Reading research in metalinguistic awareness: A classification of findings according to focus and methodology. In D.B. Yaden and S. Templeton (Eds.), Metalinguistic awareness and beginning literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Yaden, D. (1988). Understanding stories through repeated read-alouds: How many does it take? The Reading Teacher, 41(6), 556-560.


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