Activities at Home

Fun Time

Your child's multiplication skills will help spotlight the amount of time he or she spends reading or playing games.

What You Need:

  • Paper and pencil

What You and Your Child Will Do:

  1. Ask your child to record the amount of time he or she reads (or plays sports or other games) for 1 week. The chart below can be used to keep track of the books read (games played) and the total number of hours spent reading (playing) each day.
  2. At the end of the week, check your child's computation of the total number of hours spent reading or playing that week.

    DayBooks ReadNumber of Hours per Day
    Monday  
    Tuesday  
    Wednesday  
    Thursday  
    Friday  
    Saturday  
    Sunday  
    Total Number of Hours per Week: 

  3. Suppose that your child reports a total of 16 hours of reading for the week. Suggest that the 16 hours is typical of the number of hours spent reading every week. Then, based on this number, challenge the child to find these amounts:
    • the number of hours spent reading in 10 weeks
    • the number of hours spent reading in 100 weeks (about 2 years)
    • the number of hours spent reading in 1,000 weeks (about 20 years)