Meet the Author

Ann Turner

Portrait of Ann Turner

Ann Turner wrote her first story when she was eight years old. It was about a dragon and a dwarf named Puckity. She still uses that story when she talks to students about writing, to show them that they too have stories worth telling.

Turner has always loved to write, but at first she was afraid she couldn't make a living doing it. So she trained to be a teacher instead. After a year of teaching, however, she decided she would rather write books than talk about them in school.

Turner's first children's book was about vultures and was illustrated by her mother. She has written more than 40 books since then, most of them historical picture books. She likes to think of a character in a specific time and place in American history and then tell a story about that character so that readers today can know what it was like to live long ago.


Ann Turner says that stories choose her, rather than the other way around: "I often feel as if I am walking along quietly, minding my own business, when a story creeps up behind me and taps me on the shoulder. 'Tell me, show me, write me!' it whispers in my ear. And if I don't tell that story, it wakes me up in the morning, shakes me out of my favorite afternoon nap, and insists upon being told."


Photography Credit

Turner

Other Books Written by Ann Turner

  • Sewing Quilts
    (illustrated by Thomas B. Allen)
  • Dust for Dinner
    (illustrated by Robert Barrett)
  • One Brave Summer
  • Nettie's Trip South
    (illustrated by Ron Himler)
  • Shaker Hearts
    (illustrated by Wendell Minor)
  • Mississippi Mud: Three Prairie Journals
    (illustrated by Robert J. Blake)
  • Finding Walter
  • Angel Hide and Seek
    (illustrated by Lois Ehlert)
  • Drummer Boy: Marching to the Civil War
    (illustrated by Mark Hess)
  • Red Flower Goes West
    (illustrated by Dennis Nolan)
  • The Girl Who Chased Away Sorrow
  • Grasshopper Summer
  • Dakota Dugout
    (illustrated by Ron Himler)
  • Secrets from the Dollhouse
    (illustrated by Raul Colón)